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Programming Archive

Thursday, November 1, 2012 - 7:00pm

A 4-hour tribute to one of the great folk groups of all time. In 1959, Glenn Yarborough, Alex Hassilev, and Lou Gottlieb burst on to the folk music scene as the Limeliters. Their complex sound and sophisticated stage show made them an ovenight sensation. TIME magazine said that  "If the button down scrubbed looking Kingston Trio are the undergraduates of big-time folk sing-ing, The Limeliters are the faculty." Over the ensuing decades, the Limeliters went through a variety of lineup changes, but they still go on today. Join host Nick Noble for a four hour journey through the career and musical outpourings of the Limeliters: from the suggestive nuances of "Vicky Dougan", "Le Jour de Luth" and "Have Some Madeira, M'Dear" through the double-Grammy nominated album for kids-- Through Children's Eyes-- and on into the 21st century, the Limeliters represent all that is best and most memorable from the folk revival period and its legacy. Tune in and enjoy!

Thursday, November 1, 2012 - 11:00am

The special guests on tonight’s Inquiry are LEXI LEE SULLIVAN, Assistant Curator at the Decordova Sculpture Park and Museum and RACHAEL ARAUZ independent curator. They are here to talk about two new exciting and thought provoking exhibitions at the Decordova: two collaborative installations by JEAN SHIN and BRIAN RIPEL, CASTLES IN THE AIR and MEASURING THE DEPTHS OF HIS OWN NATURE and a retrospective exhibition of the work of JULIANNE SWARTZ titled HOW DEEP IS YOUR. Tune in and learn about these interesting artists and their work. For more details about these exhibitions, go to: http://www.decordova.org/ 

Thursday, November 1, 2012 - 10:00am

Massachusetts historian and natural historian JOHN GALLUZZO decided that for the year 2011 he would take a 30 minute hike in a green space in every town and city in the state. It was a mammoth task to undertake and plan. John had to deal with poor weather, swarms of insects and family crises, but in the end he accomplished his goal. Tune in tonight and listen to John talk about what the real goal of this amazing project was; what some of his favorite places in the state were and what he learned along the way. His book, which is also a nice guide to walking and hiking spots across the state is HALF AND HOUR A DAY ACROSS MASSACHUSETTS. 

Wednesday, October 31, 2012 - 7:00pm

Join Nick DiBiasio on Halloween night, Wednesday October 31 from 7 to 11pm, for the annual Against The Grain Halloween Special, featuring spooky music and eerie sounds, including murder ballads and songs about demons, witches, vampires, werewolves, spiders, ghosts, gravediggers, and psychos by Johnny Cash, Bob Dylan, Richard Thompson, Warren Zevon, The Band, Marty Robbins, The Grateful Dead, and many more!

Wednesday, October 31, 2012 - 1:30pm

Neil Sedaka is synonymous with popular music. For more than 50 years, he's written, performed and produced the soundtrack for America's collective psyche. Sedaka had a string of early-1960s pop hits, and his songs have been recorded by Frank Sinatra, Connie Francis, Elvis Presley and The Monkees, among others. Sedaka is truly a balladeer at heart.

"I think there are three kinds of songs, it's only my theory: psychological, emotional and spiritual," Sedaka says. "When you write psychologically or intellectually, you have a tune in your mind and you re-write it. It's an intellectual approach. The emotional is my favorite because it comes from my kishkas; it comes from my soul. It's a catharsis, you get it out, you cry it out, you let it go. The spiritual writing of the song is where you're chosen as a vehicle and it comes from something up above. You don't move; it writes itself. It's very spooky, but that's happened to me just a few times."

On this episode of Song Travels, host Michael Feinstein and his guest talk and play iconic pop and great standards, including one of his many hits: "Breaking Up Is Hard to Do."

Tuesday, October 30, 2012 - 6:00pm

Joining Judy Carmichael is British bassist Dave Green, and he discusses his long career playing with everyone from Ben Webster and Coleman Hawkins, to his band with Rolling Stones drummer Charlie Watts.

Monday, October 29, 2012 - 7:00pm

Celebrate Halloween with host Tom Shaker on this Monday's show. Scary soul and frightening funk music all night long…it all starts at 7pm!

Sunday, October 28, 2012 - 10:30pm

Lions and Tigers and Bears, oh my. No its not Dorothy or the Wizard of OZ. This week Al is joined by Bob Derr, Editorial Director of TIME for Kids a subsidiary of TIME magazine. They recently published a new childrens book entitled, ZOO-3D. This book is filled with 3D pictures of  over a hundred full page pictures and stories of wild animals. Just when you think tehnology has replaced traditional reading TIME has answered the call with an engaging and educational book that has young people reading and learning about the animal kingdom. Tune in this Sunday evening at 10:30 and hear Bobs Derr's approach to getting children both young and old to read.

Sunday, October 28, 2012 - 10:00pm

In an encore episode, Steve interviews Ken Stafford, director of of WPI's Robotics Resource Center and associate director of WPI's Robotics Engineering Program.  They talk about the present and future of robotics in business and society.

Whether the goal is to relieve human workers of exhausting and repetitive tasks, increase productivity and efficiency, or take people out of harm’s way, robotics plays an integral role in all aspects of manufacturing, medicine, and more. And it will take on even greater importance in the future.

In fact, the demand for qualified robotics engineers is poised to grow by as much as 13 percent through 2018, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

WPI is the first university in the nation to offer a bachelor's degree program in Robotics Engineering--- and first to offer MS and PhD degrees. As a result, WPI is committed to providing hands-on, practical education to tomorrow’s robotics engineers.

Ken came to WPI in 1994 as the department head of Aerospace Studies. Shortly after his retirement as a U.S. Air Force colonel in 1997, he was hired to manage several WPI student-design competition teams. One of them was the WPI/Massachusetts Academy of Math and Science FIRST robotics team. This team has since grown to become one of the most popular student activities at WPI and has received more than 60 local, regional, and international awards and trophies -- including the 2007 World Championship.

Ken was also a member of the WPI interdisciplinary team that developed the school’s Robotics Engineering curriculum and established its bachelor’s, master’s, and PhD degree programs in robotics engineering. He is shown, far right, posing with WPI's Robotics Team.

Sunday, October 28, 2012 - 9:00pm

In 1835, the capital of the United States was known as Washington City. The President at that time was Andrew Jackson, who was pro-slavery. But at least 4,000 inhabitants of the city were former slaves called “free men”. Racial tensions and relations in the Washington City reflected the conflicted feelings of the country as a whole. There were many white people who still believed in slavery of course; however, there were others who thought we should end slavery but send the Black Americans back to Africa. True Abolitionists were gaining ground, yet their ideas and literature were considered subversive in Washington. The Red and Blue dynamics we see in the political landscape today was started at this time. Key players included Francis Scott Key, who penned The Star Spangles Banner, but who had a later political career in which he became a champion of slavery. Tune in tonight when we talk about this complicated story of race, politics and little known American history with reporter, correspondent and writer Jefferson Morley. Morley’s new must-read history is titled "Snow Storm in August: Washington City, Francis Scott Key and the Forgotten Race Riot of 1835.

Horror films have been made since the beginning of cinema. Thomas Edison made one of the earliest film treatments of the Frankenstein novel. Since those early days, horror films have had a long, complex multinational history. Tonight’s guest on Inquiry is Dr. Wheeler Winston Dixon the James Ryan Endowed Professor of Film Studies and professor of English at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln. His latest book on film history is one of the most complete and far ranging histories of this genre: "A History of Horror." Tonight we discuss the beginnings of the horror film and concentrate on the fascinating story of the British film company Hammer Films, which in the 1960s reinvigorated the cinema of horror with classic films like The Curse of Frankenstein and Dracula, Prince of Darkness and made international stars of Peter Cushing and Christopher Lee. If you are passionate about horror films, don’t miss tonight’s show!

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